Sex-specific and age-specific incidence of ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation and heart failure in community patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Amy Groenewegen, Victor W. Zwartkruis, Lennart J. Smit, Rudolf A. de Boer, Michiel Rienstra, Arno W. Hoes, Monika Hollander, Frans H. Rutten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence of ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation and heart failure in community patients with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: For this population-based study, we used primary care data of the Julius General Practitioners' Network. Eligible participants were aged 40-80 years old and contributed data between January 2014 and February 2019. Participants were divided into groups according to COPD status and were followed up for new ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation and/or heart failure. Age-specific and sex-specific incidence and incidence rate ratios were calculated for patients with and without COPD. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 3.9 years, 6223 patients were included in the COPD group, and 137 028 individuals in the background group without COPD. Incidence rates of all three heart diseases increased with age and were higher in males, independent of presence of COPD. Incidence rate ratios for patients with COPD, adjusted for age and sex, were 1.69 (95% CI 1.49 to 1.92) for ischaemic heart disease, 1.56 (95% CI 1.38 to 1.77) for atrial fibrillation and 2.96 (95% CI 2.58 to 3.40) for heart failure. CONCLUSION: The incidence of all major cardiovascular diseases is higher in patients with COPD, with the highest incidence rate ratio observed for heart failure.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere001307
JournalBMJ open respiratory research
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • COPD epidemiology

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