Pain Coping and Healthcare Use in Patients with Early Knee and/or Hip Osteoarthritis: 10-Year Follow-Up Data from the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee (CHECK) Study

Meike C van Scherpenseel, Corelien J J Kloek, Cindy Veenhof, Martijn F Pisters

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) among older adults account for substantial disability and extensive healthcare use. Effective pain coping strategies help to deal with OA. This study aims to determine the long-term relationship between pain coping style and the course of healthcare use in patients with knee and/or hip OA over 10 years.

METHODS: Baseline and 10-year follow-up data of 861 Dutch participants with early knee and/or hip OA from the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee (CHECK) cohort were used. The amount of healthcare use (HCU) and pain coping style were measured. Generalized Estimating Equations were used, adjusted for relevant confounders.

RESULTS: At baseline, 86.5% of the patients had an active pain coping style. Having an active pain coping style was significantly (p = 0.022) associated with an increase of 16.5% (95% CI, 2.0-32.7) in the number of used healthcare services over 10 years.

CONCLUSION: Patients with early knee and/or hip OA with an active pain coping style use significantly more different healthcare services over 10 years, as opposed to those with a passive pain coping style. Further research should focus on altered treatment (e.g., focus on self-management) in patients with an active coping style, to reduce HCU.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7455
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical medicine
Volume12
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2023

Keywords

  • CHECK
  • healthcare utilization
  • osteoarthritis
  • pain coping

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