Novel evidence hat attributing affectively salient signal to random noise is associated with psychosis

Ana Catalan, Claudia J.P. Simons, Sonia Bustamante, Marjan Drukker, Aranzazu Madrazo, Maider Gonzalez De Artaza, Iñigo Gorostiza, Jim Van Os, Miguel A. Gonzalez-Torres

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We wished to replicate evidence that an experimental paradigm of speech illusions is associated with psychotic experiences. Fifty-four patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) and 150 healthy subjects were examined in an experimental paradigm assessing the presence of speech illusion in neutral white noise. Socio-demographic, cognitive function and family history data were collected. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered in the patient group and the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (SIS-R), and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) in the control group. Patients had a much higher rate of speech illusions (33.3% versus 8.7%, OR adjusted: 5.1, 95% CI: 2.3-11.5), which was only partly explained by differences in IQ (ORadjusted: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.4-8.3). Differences were particularly marked for signals in random noise that were perceived as affectively salient (ORadjusted: 9.7, 95% CI: 1.8-53.9). Speech illusion tended to be associated with positive symptoms in patients (OR adjusted: 3.3, 95% CI: 0.9-11.6), particularly affectively salient illusions (ORadjusted: 8.3, 95% CI: 0.7-100.3). In controls, speech illusions were not associated with positive schizotypy (ORadjusted: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.3-3.4) or self-reported psychotic experiences (OR adjusted: 1.4, 95% CI: 0.4-4.6). Experimental paradigms indexing the tendency to detect affectively salient signals in noise may be used to identify liability to psychosis.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere102520
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

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