Not surgical technique, but etiology, contralateral MRI, prior surgery, and side of surgery determine seizure outcome after pediatric hemispherotomy

Georgia Ramantani*, Christine Bulteau, Dorottya Cserpan, Willem M. Otte, Georg Dorfmüller, J. Helen Cross, Josef Zentner, Martin Tisdall, Kees P.J. Braun

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Objective: We aimed to assess determinants of seizure outcome following pediatric hemispherotomy in a contemporary cohort. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the seizure outcomes of 457 children who underwent hemispheric surgery in five European epilepsy centers between 2000 and 2016. We identified variables related to seizure outcome through multivariable regression modeling with missing data imputation and optimal group matching, and we further investigated the role of surgical technique by Bayes factor (BF) analysis. Results: One hundred seventy seven children (39%) underwent vertical and 280 children (61%) underwent lateral hemispherotomy. Three hundred forty-four children (75%) achieved seizure freedom at a mean follow-up of 5.1 years (range 1 to 17.1). We identified acquired etiology other than stroke (odds ratio [OR] 4.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–18.0), hemimegalencephaly (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1–7.3), contralateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (OR 5.5, 95% CI 2.7–11.1), prior resective surgery (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.8–14.0), and left hemispherotomy (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3–3.9) as significant determinants of seizure recurrence. We found no evidence of an impact of the hemispherotomy technique on seizure outcome (the BF for a model including the hemispherotomy technique over the null model was 1.1), with comparable overall major complication rates for different approaches. Significance: Knowledge about the independent determinants of seizure outcome following pediatric hemispherotomy will improve the counseling of patients and families. In contrast to previous reports, we found no statistically relevant difference in seizure-freedom rates between the vertical and horizontal hemispherotomy techniques when accounting for different clinical features between groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1214-1224
Number of pages11
JournalEpilepsia
Volume64
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2023

Keywords

  • hemispheric surgery
  • hemispherotomy
  • pediatric epilepsy
  • seizure outcome

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