Long-term Clinical Outcome of Antibody Replacement Therapy in Humoral Immunodeficient Adults With Respiratory Tract Infections

Diana A van Kessel, Thijs W Hoffman, Heleen van Velzen-Blad, Pieter Zanen, Jan Grutters, Ger T Rijkers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In severe humoral immunodeficiency the indication for antibody replacement therapy (ART) is clear, and supported by several large studies. However, for milder forms of humoral immunodeficiency, the indication for ART is less clear. This is a retrospective cohort study of 87 adults with recurrent respiratory tract infections who received ART. The patients had severe or mild humoral immunodeficiency, and were followed up for a median of 62months. Infection frequency, pharmacy-registered antibiotics use and hospital admissions significantly decreased under ART compared to the year prior to starting ART (median 5.50 (anamnestically)-0.82 (physician-confirmed) infections/year, p<0.001; median 4.00-2.05antibioticscourses/year, p<0.001; mean 0.75-0.44hospitaladmissions/year, p=0.009). These beneficial effects of ART were seen in both severe and mild immunodeficiency. Bronchiectasis was present in 27 patients when ART was started, but was not associated with clinical outcomes. An increase in hospital admissions under ART, observed in some patients, was significantly associated with pulmonary emphysema and current smoking. In conclusion, this study shows that ART is a long-term effective therapy in adults with recurrent respiratory tract infections with severe as well as with milder forms of humoral immunodeficiency.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)254–260
Number of pages7
JournalEBioMedicine
Volume18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

Keywords

  • Gammaglobulin
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Immunoglobulin
  • Primary antibody deficiency
  • respiratory tract infections

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Long-term Clinical Outcome of Antibody Replacement Therapy in Humoral Immunodeficient Adults With Respiratory Tract Infections'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this