Community-Based Strategies to Improve Health-Related Outcomes in People Living With Hypertension in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Solomon Nyame*, Daniel Boateng, Pauline Heeres, Joyce Gyamfi, Lebo F Gafane-Matemane, John Amoah, Juliet Iwelunmor, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Diederick Grobbee, Kwaku Poku Asante, Kerstin Klipstein-Grobusch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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Abstract

Background: Individuals living with hypertension are at an increased risk of cardiovascular- and cerebrovascular-related outcomes. Interventions implemented at the community level to improve hypertension control are considered useful to prevent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events; however, systematic evaluation of such community level interventions among patients living in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is scarce. Methods: Nine databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster randomized control trials (cRCTs) implementing community level interventions in adults with hypertension in LMICs. Studies were included based on explicit focus on blood pressure control. Quality assessment was done using the Revised Cochrane Risk of Bias tool for randomized trials (ROBS 2). Results were presented according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist. Fixed-effect meta-analyses were conducted for studies that reported continuous outcome measures. Results: We identified and screened 7125 articles. Eighteen studies, 7 RCTs and 11 cRCTs were included in the analysis. The overall summary effect of blood pressure control was significant, risk ratio = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.40-1.57, n = 12). Risk ratio for RCTs was 1.68 (95%CI = 1.40-2.01, n = 5), for cRCTs risk ratio = 1.46 (95%CI = 1.32-1.61, n = 7). For studies that reported individual data for the multicomponent interventions, the risk ratio was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.04-1.54, n = 3). Discussion: Community-based strategies are relevant in addressing the burden of hypertension in LMICs. Community-based interventions can help decentralize hypertension care in LMIC and address the access to care gap without diminishing the quality of hypertension control.

Original languageEnglish
Article number51
Number of pages18
JournalGlobal Heart
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jun 2024

Keywords

  • blood pressure control
  • community-based strategies
  • hypertension
  • low middle income countries

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